Queen Victoria’s Crown

Queen Victoria’s Small Crown, designed in 1870, will be on display this summer in London. As part of the celebrations for the Diamond Jubilee, the Queen has released a large selection of her personal jewels to be put on exhibition. This crown is perhaps the most iconic of all of Queen Victoria’s diamonds, as it formed the crowning glory of her imperious silhouette.

Diamonds: A Jubilee Celebration is at the Buckingham Palace State Rooms will be open to the public until early October.

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13 thoughts on “Queen Victoria’s Crown

    1. I’m not sure for certain, but I think it’s weight must have done a pretty good job at helping it stay put. The crown is no longer in everyday use, so the head supports from the inside of the rim will have been removed. If you take a close look at the crowns that the Queen wears today, there is a ring of cushioning on the inside of the crown to help it stay in place. The Queen also does “crown training” to help her walk with poise while still keeping the crown in place (as well as strengthening her neck muscles)… sounds like a tough work out to me! 🙂

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  1. I was aware that the large crowns had a means of adjustment to accomodate monarchs with different size heads. However, the Small Crown, with its 3.5 inch diameter wouldn’t even fit an infant. I know Queen Victoria perched it on top of her widow’s cap with beautiful and regal effect. But how she kept both perched on top of her head while she moved about is a mystery I’d like to solve since i am playing her in a performance next month.

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    1. I think its weight and some training probably kept it in place, as the Queen’s current crowns are held in place. I’m afraid that I don’t know who coached the Queen in how to walk holding a crown in place, but they must have been pretty good because she doesn’t use her hands 😉
      Good luck with your performance, and if you solve this mystery then please let us all know how you did it 🙂

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      1. I have a replica of this crown, although it is by no means an accurate one. I sewed it to the widow’s cap and keep the cap in place with combs and hatpins. At least it doesn’t slide off when I nod.

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      2. That’s wonderful! Have you got any pictures?
        I suspect that the Queen’s crowns have some kind of structural supports that go through her hair, but I’ve never actually seen any evidence of this… I’ll keep looking! 😉

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      3. As a matter of fact I do have pictures, although very few good ones. Of the three crowns I have, this is the most accurate even though it’s much too large:

        This one is the correct size, but is woefully inaccurate:

        The third is the least accurate of all and was made by my “Mr. Brown”.. It’s made of brass, has the correct diameter but is much too tall and is only for Steampunk events:

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      4. Thank you for the kind words. The large crown was ordered from England and took about 3 months to get to me. The small crown was made by an acquaintence who supported my idea to “become” the queen. He took the idea and put his own spin on it. The result came to me in a little under 6 months.

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  2. they look amazing! I’m so impressed that you and your fiance made a replica crown, they look great! Can I ask where in England you ordered the repica from? And what play are you starring in as Queen Victoria?

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  3. I am so sorry it took so long to get back to you. I haven’t been back to this site. As for where I ordered my crown, this is the link:

    http://www.stagejewellery.com/jewellery-1/stage-jewellery/crowns/stage-crowns-replica-queen-victoria-s-crown-95012-stage-crown.html#

    However, I have to warn you although it looks very good from the stage, it is heavy to wear, hard to keep on your head and much larger than the real thing. It’s about 4.25 inches in diameter and looks “whiter” because while the real crown has tarnished over the years, this one is treated so it never will.

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